Categories
Blog News Technology

What happened when I was put in the driving seat at the Australian Grand Prix executive breakfast?

Let me start by explaining what I mean by driving seat; I was a discussion moderator at the Australian Grand Prix Corporation breakfast in Melbourne. The breakfast was run by the British Consulate General on the topic ‘The Impact of Innovation’.

I want to start by thanking one of the attendees, Michael Hendricks, Chief Risk Officer, Australia at Revolut for sharing his two-favourite and very poignant take aways from the discussion:

“Real innovation is setting a very ambitious goal that you don’t yet have a solution for” & “Unless we get cognitive diversity, we won’t get innovation”

I would like to also add my own top takeaways, but firstly thank you to such a great panel who made my job as moderator an absolute joy.

We covered a lot of engaging topics, but the following really stood out for me (in my own words);

Failing often spurs on innovation.

Australian culture can in some cases hold back innovation as the fear of failure is too overwhelming. Australia would do well to embrace the UK’s attitude to failure.

The definition of innovation.

Sally-Ann Williams, CEO of Cicada Innovation came from the view point that true innovation needed to be radical innovation, not incremental as often seen here in Australia, playing it too safe.   Pat Symonds, Chief Technical Officer from Formula 1 agreed there was a place for radical information and he came from the school of three types of innovation:

  • Incremental Innovation. Existing Technology, Existing Market.
  • Disruptive Innovation. New Technology, Existing Market.
  • Radical Innovation. New Technology, New Market.
Innovation and Diversity.

Pat Symonds, also raised that at one point in his career as a leader he realised his engineering team, albeit extremely capable – they team had similar experiences and backgrounds, with a lack of diversity in thinking, they got a lot done but,  because they agreed on most things, no one was being challenged with different perspectives. This is where Pat raised the excellent point “Unless we get cognitive diversity, we won’t get innovation”.

Diversity and collaboration.

This insight will certainly shift the perception that Formula 1 is nothing more than a gas guzzling sport. Pat provided two scenarios where they collaborated with other sectors to solve issues beyond the track to hospitals and supermarket isles.
A technology developed in Formula One racing could revolutionise refrigeration in the UK’s supermarkets and convenience stores by drastically reducing the energy needed for cooling.

The design of a new breathing aid developed by engineers at the Mercedes F1 team, University College London (UCL), and clinicians at UCL Hospital have been made freely available to support the global response to Covid-19.

A lifetime of event management and running my own marketing/event agency Best Case Scenario, has put me in a good position to know the key ingredients that made for an outstanding panel such as this;

  • the high quality of the participants themselves
  • putting in the work pre-discussion to understand the different dynamics and qualities of each panelist to bring the best out of a mix of subject matter experts.

Finally, I want to also thank the British Consul-General Victoria for hosting the  discussion that set out to discuss the opportunities and impact of technological innovation between Australia and the United Kingdom. Their goal to inform and excite attendees about current opportunities in the innovation space, with a view to furthering trade and innovation into the future was truly met.

“I wanted to write to personally thank Luli for participating in our Innovation in the Fast Lane panel on Friday. All your contributions were invaluable, and the result was a fantastic, engaging discussion spanning the importance of diversity and inclusion to get innovation; building a culture of innovation; innovation to solve global challenges; and international collaboration, to name a few topics.”

Mr Steph Lysaght, British Consul-General Victoria, South Australia, Tasmania Tweet

About Best Case Scenario

Founded in 2007, Best Case Scenario create business opportunities to empower change-makers. They believe in the power of people to create meaningful change. They leverage strong relationships within the Technology, Government, Financial and Health sector to bring the right people together to have meaningful conversations. They work with ambitious companies to help them grow and achieve outstanding results.

Connect direct with Best Case Scenario’s Founder and Director, Luli Adeyemo at luli@bestcasescenario.com.au

Categories
Blog News Technology

What Does The Future of B2B Events Look Like?

This has been challenging for some agencies, for Best Case Scenario we took this in our stride due to our vast experience in event production, logistics and technical expertise at the highest level.

Now restrictions have eased, the demand for in-person is greater than ever, however the threat of lockdowns/restrictions is never far away, which is why we can support in-person, virtual, or a hybrid mix of both.

Hybrid experiences require strong tech expertise. More than pure physical or total virtual, the hybrid space often cause complications, however our experience can eliminate this and ensure the event delivers:

  1. Integrity
  2. Acquisition of simultaneous unique content sources
  3. Synthesis of live and pre-recorded content
  4. Engagement for both live and virtual audiences
  5. A mix of speakers/presenters, and performers in various levels of interaction

Expected Outcomes From Excellent Event Planning?

An  event with a very strong technical expertise at the earliest planning stages is key to anticipating and dealing with such factors.  We ensure our team members, partners and clients are tightly aligned, leveraging real-time workflows and processes.

We harmonise across the teams to ensure we are always progressing the project.  We never stop pushing the limits of our space, we always consider ways we can improve performance, timelines and reliability to create a seamless attendee experience.

About Best Case Scenario

Founded in 2007, Best Case Scenario create business opportunities to empower change-makers. They believe in the power of people to create meaningful change. They leverage strong relationships within the Technology, Government, Financial and Health sector to bring the right people together to have meaningful conversations. They work with ambitious companies to help them grow and achieve outstanding results.

Connect direct with Best Case Scenario’s Founder and Director, Luli Adeyemo at luli@bestcasescenario.com.au

Categories
News

Event social media marketing

How can event planners differentiate their event social media marketing?

Hypothetically speaking let’s say an event planner secures a speaker with a very active social media profile. Let’s imagine it is Google’s CEO, Eric Schmidt, first on the list of top 10 CEOs using Twitter, with 2.34 million followers. Let’s take this dream scenario to the next level, Eric is so impressed by the content of the event he happily ‘boasts’ he is speaking on more than one occasion. Job done?

Event planners have every reason to believe they have hit the jackpot, especially since research conducted by CEO.com revealed social media adoption is sluggish among Fortune 500 CEOs: 61% are not active on any of the major social networks, so this is a dream situation.

Let’s get back to reality, when it comes to event social media marketing a robust plan should be launched at least 14 weeks out from the event date.

Recently, Best Case Scenario was approached by an organisation who had an established event but wanted to increase their delegate attendance by 30%.  This wasn’t an unrealistic goal, we researched their target audience in terms of potential growth and also reviewed the event’s social media footprint.

We were very impressed with the volume of attendee-generated content during and post-event. To us, this was more than an Eric Schmidt moment.  It was the event attendees who were consumers of the event generating content.  According to a Comscore study , when people are exposed to a mixture of user generated content (UGC) and professional content, engagement can increase by up to 28%, taking the burden off event organisers.

Leveraging this content for our client’s next event is a no-brainer but is often overlooked in social media marketing plans. It’s easy to get mislead by vanity metrics, such as likes and followers.

The below principles for event social media will avoid any over reliance on an Eric Schmidt moment.

  • Event content should be at the heart of the social media campaign
  • Make conversation a focus, as well as a structure around storytelling for each topic focus
  • Address the delegate journey from awareness to registration in your social media planning
  • Encourage collaboration with clients, sponsors and media

Do not use social media marketing as a stand-alone campaign, leverage traditional marketing opportunities also such a PR, Telemarketing etc…

Jen Murray has worked in the field of event marketing for over 20 years. Recently she earned herself a Diploma in Digital Marketing (Distinction) from the Digital Marketing Institute. Her background includes working for organisations such as Polycom, BancTec and Gartner.